Student Project on Second Ward

Bill Veeder oral history interview, 2004 April 23
Interview conducted over telephone. Poor quality recording. Interviewee cannot always be heard clearly., Bill Veeder was approximately 80-years-old at the time of interview, which took place over the telephone. He was born in New York in approximately 1924. He graduated from Colgate University and was employed as the city manager for the city of Charlotte, North Carolina, manager of Carowinds amusement park, and president of the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce., Bill Veeder recounts his experiences as the city manager of Charlotte, North Carolina during the 1960s and his involvement with the city's urban renewal program. He discusses working with the Charlotte City Council; the executive director of the Charlotte Redevelopment Commission, Vernon Sawyer; the urban renewal committees; and Mayor Stanford Brookshire. He explains the city of Charlotte's motivations for urban renewal and how he believes that the project benefited the residents of the Brooklyn neighborhood, which was torn down, and the city of Charlotte., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
Arthur Wallace Sr. oral history interview, 2004 March 18
Recording begins abruptly in the middle of conversation related to the interview. The interview doesn't get started until about 6:15 into the recording. Interviewee's voice is quiet and can be difficult to hear at times., Arthur Wallace Sr. was an eighty seven-year-old man at the time of interview, which took place at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina. He was born in Charlotte in 1916., Arthur Wallace Sr. shares his memories of the Brooklyn neighborhood of Charlotte, North Carolina, also known as Second Ward. He focuses on his experiences attending Friendship Baptist Missionary Church, which he joined in 1933, including church leadership, choirs, tithing, visiting the sick, and the church's place in the Brooklyn community. Mr. Wallace also discusses the many businesses in Brooklyn and the United House of Prayer for All People. He describes the impact of Charlotte's urban renewal program of the 1960s on Friendship Baptist Missionary Church, which moved from Brooklyn to west Charlotte.
George A. Wallace oral history interview, 2004 March 24
George A. Wallace was a 61-year-old man at the time of interview, which took place in his office. He was born in Charlotte, North Carolina in 1943. He was educated at Second Ward High School, took courses on business administration, and was employed as an executive director of a community development corporation., George Wallace discusses his life in the Grier Heights neighborhood of Charlotte, North Carolina, and his connection to the Brooklyn neighborhood in Charlotte, also known as Second Ward. Mr. Wallace talks about his deep roots in Grier Heights, including how his grandfather was one of the founders of Grier Heights and his work with a non-profit development corporation working in the community. He also discusses visiting businesses in Brooklyn and its role as a hub of the African American community. He describes how most of the residents and businesses in Brooklyn were forced to relocate during urban renewal in the 1960s and 1970s and how he believes that urban renewal negatively impacted black entrepreneurship and the black community in Charlotte., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
Allegra Westbrooks oral history interview, 2007 March 12
Allegra Westbrooks was an 86-year-old woman at the time of interview. She was born in Cumberland, Maryland in 1921. She was educated at Clark Atlanta University, School of Library Services and was employed as head of library services at the Brevard Street Library and with the public library system in Charlotte, North Carolina., Allegra Westbrooks recounts her thirty-six year career as head of library services at the segregated Brevard Street Library, located in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Charlotte, North Carolina, also known as Second Ward, and later in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg public library. She describes library services and programs, including starting a discussion group centered around African American religion, serving neighborhoods without libraries with a bookmobile, and using clubs and churches to promote reading. Ms. Westbrooks discusses how the Brevard Street Library, a part of the Charlotte public library system, closed in 1961 as the libraries became integrated, and describes the community\u2019s reaction to the closing. She also describes urban renewal in Charlotte during the 1960s and 1970s, the reason why she believes Brooklyn was targeted for urban renewal, and the African American community's relationship with local government during that time., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
Arthur Williams oral history interview, 2007 March 30
Hissing sound. Recording becomes louder at about 44 minutes in the interview., Arthur Williams was a 75-year-old man at the time of interview, which took place in his home in Charlotte, North Carolina. He was born in Charlotte in 1931. He graduated from Greenville High School and was employed as a master sergeant in the U.S. Army and owned and operated a shoeshine business., Arthur Williams shares his memories of growing up in the Brooklyn neighborhood in Charlotte, North Carolina, also known as Second Ward. He discusses residents and small businesses in Brooklyn, including his uncle's barbershop, N.G. Edwards Barber, and the shoe shine business that he owned and operated as a boy during the Second World War. He talks in detail about the United House of Prayer for All People, including the founder of the church, Bishop Charles Manuel "Daddy" Grace, differences between the House of Prayer and Grace A.M.E. Zion, the church's impact on the Brooklyn community, and how other churches later copied the House of Prayer because of its success. He also briefly discusses urban renewal in Charlotte during the 1960s and 1970s and why the younger residents who had left Second Ward during that period did not want to return., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
Dianne Wyche oral history interview, 2007 April 28
Dianne Wyche was a 61-year-old woman at the time of interview, which took place in the home of Carolyne Wyche in Charlotte, North Carolina. She was born in Charlotte in 1945. She graduated from Bennett College and was employed as a teacher and systems analyst., Dianne Wyche shares her memories of the Brooklyn neighborhood of Charlotte, North Carolina also known as Second Ward. She recalls her father Dr. Rudolph Wyche and his medical practice in Brooklyn, including the types of surgeries he would perform, how he was paid, accompanying him on house calls, and how urban renewal affected Dr. Wyche's business. Ms. Wyche also discusses her memories of Bishop Daddy Grace, the leader of the United House of Prayer for All People, which had a strong presence in Second Ward, and the House of Prayer convocation parade., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
James Yancey and Ozener Yancey oral history interview, 2004 March 23
Background noise from the restaurant throughout the interview., James Yancey was a 72-year-old man at the time of interview, which took place in a Shoney's restaurant in Charlotte, North Carolina. He was born in Charlotte in 1932. He graduated from Johnson C. Smith University and was employed as a social worker and counselor. Ozener S. Yancey was a 74-year-old woman at the time of interview. She graduated from Second Ward High School., James and Ozener Yancey share their experiences in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Charlotte, North Carolina, also known as Second Ward. Mr. Yancey discusses his career as a juvenile probation officer and social worker. He describes the urban renewal process in Charlotte during the 1960s and 1970s, include declining property conditions, how the city notified homeowners that they would need to move out of their homes and how homeowners were compensated, and the relationship between social workers and relocation officers. Mr. and Mrs. Yancey both also discuss attending Friendship Baptist Church and describe the church's stained glass windows, Bishop Dell and Reverend Carey, and Sunday school., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
James Yancey, Ida James, and Ozener Yancey oral history interview, 2004 March 16
The first portion of the interview was not recorded. The audio recording begins abruptly in the middle of conversation after 15 minutes of silence, which was removed from the audio file prior to ingest. No known recording of the first part of the interview exists., This interview took place at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church in Charlotte, North Carolina. James Yancey was a 72-year-old man at the time of interview. He was born in Charlotte in 1932. He graduated from Johnson C. Smith University and was employed as a juvenile probation social worker and domestic court counselor. Ida M. James was a 70-year-old woman at the time of interview. She was born in South Carolina in 1934. She graduated from high school and completed two years of trade school, and was employed as a cafeteria manager. Ozener S. Yancey graduated from Second Ward High School., James Yancey, Ida James, and Ozener Yancey share their memories of Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, which was located in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Charlotte, North Carolina, also known as Second Ward, until 1970. All three interviewees discuss their involvement with the church, dating back as early as the 1940s, including congregants, funeral services, church leadership, and how the church changed over the decades since they had become members. Mr. Yancey also talks about Charlotte's urban renewal of the 1960s and how he considered it to be "black removal" and painful for the Second Ward community., Ozener Yancey and James Yancey oral history interview, 2004 March 23, J. Murrey Atkins Library Special Collections and University Archives, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.
Cleo A. Yongue oral history interview, 2004 March 29
Cleo A. Yongue was a 90-year-old woman at the time of the interview, which took place in Charlotte, North Carolina. She was born in Darlington, South Carolina in 1914. She graduated with a Certificate in Public Health and was employed as a visiting field nurse for the Charlotte and Mecklenburg County Health Department and a school nurse at Myers Street Elementary and Second Ward High School., Cleo A. Yongue recounts her thirty-six year career as a nurse for the Mecklenburg County Health Department and her experiences in the Brooklyn community in Charlotte, North Carolina, also known as Second Ward. She describes her work as an African American nurse in the Mecklenburg County Health Department during segregation, which included performing house calls, school visits, and working in maternity and well baby clinics in Brooklyn. Other topics include transportation around Charlotte, integration in the workplace, and how urban renewal affected Brooklyn and Charlotte's African American community., Digitization made possible by funding from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act as administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources.